These famous Austin fries were named some of the best in U.S.

You know what fries go well with? Burgers. You know what else they go well with? The endorphin-rushing satisfaction of national culinary praise.

(Photo by Dale Rice/AMERICAN-STATESMAN file)

The locally beloved French fries served at Hyde Park Bar & Grill have been named among the 20 best in the country by Food & Wine magazine. From the magazine’s accolade:

“Hyde Park treats its fries like many people treat fried chicken: by soaking cut potatoes in buttermilk, battering them, and then frying them. They’re served with a side of mayo that’s kicked up with jalapeños and dill. Possibly the most famous fries in Austin, and deservedly so.”

As a news release from the restaurant points out, this is not the first honor bestowed upon the fried tubers. Last year, the dish also made Food Network Magazine’s list of “10 Best French Fries in the US” list and People’s “15 Best French Fries in the US” list. The fries have been on the Hyde Park Bar & Grill menu since the restaurant opened in 1982.

MORE: Here’s where to celebrate National French Fry Day in Austin

We should also mention that Austin360 restaurant critic Matthew Odam calls the Hyde Park fries some of the most “overrated” in Austin.

READ: Whataburger puts French fry pedicabs in Austin for SXSW

Also on the list with an Austin connection: the duck fat fries at Salty Sow. Food & Wine spotlights the egg-and-béarnaise-topped dish at the gastropub’s Arizona location, though you can get the same fries at the Austin location on Manor Road.

This Texas Hill Country getaway was named one of the South’s best small towns

One of Central Texans’ favorite weekend getaways has been named one of the best small towns in the South by Southern Living magazine.

RELATED: Call yourself a Texan? Make sure these spots are on your Texas travel bucket list

“What is it about a small town that hooks us? Whether they’re waterfront or mountaintop, the great ones all have a few things in common: a thriving downtown with locally owned restaurants, shops, and galleries; a touch of the artsy; loads of character; friendly locals; and, of course, a beautiful location,” the magazine wrote.

That’s why Fredericksburg is No. 2 on the magazine’s list of the best small towns in the South.

RELATED: 5 Texas trips to take right now

Peach season typically runs from mid-May through the first week of August. Kids will love picking their own at several orchards in and around Fredericksburg. credit: Mauri Elbel

It’s easy to see why: The Hill Country town is full of beautiful scenery, and thanks to its ever-growing number of wineries, great food and plenty of bed and breakfasts and guest houses with character (like Starry’s Studio), it’s great for a day trip or a weekend getaway. Visitors can hike Enchanted Rock, enjoy authentic German food and check out the shops in the historic downtown district.

RELATED: Hand-pick your adventure in Fredericksburg

When did Mötley Crüe become classic rock? Ask San Antonio

 

When did Mötley Crüe become classic rock? Sometime around the time when radio stations started using data to craft their playlists, according to a FiveThirtyEight post.

NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 12: Nikki Sixx and Vince Neil perform onstage during Motley Crue: The Final Tour "All Good Things Must Come To An End" at Barclays Center of Brooklyn on August 12, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY – AUGUST 12: Nikki Sixx and Vince Neil perform onstage during Motley Crue: The Final Tour “All Good Things Must Come To An End” at Barclays Center of Brooklyn on August 12, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images)

These days, Mötley Crüe, Led Zeppelin and Ozzy Osborne are considered classic rock. But they weren’t always. And, as any Gen Xer (or Millennial) who’s heard Pearl Jam or Green Day on their local classic rock station can tell you, there comes a time when they ask, “When did ‘Longview’ become ‘classic?'”

According to FiveThirtyEight, radio stations these days use a lot of data mining to figure out what their listeners like, and then they cater to that when they make playlists.

“The standard in the industry these days is an online music test or an auditorium music test where you just gather a sample and have them rate songs based on the hooks — the most familiar parts of the song — and you just get back a whole slew of data,” Clear Channel classic rock brand manager Eric Wellman said in the blog post. He added that the year a song was released has nothing to do with it becoming a “classic rock” song. Instead, the classic rock genre’s ability to grow based on listener reviews and data is what makes the genre last so long.

More: One Texas city made the list of best places to raise the ‘next rock star’ … and it’s not Austin

As a result, companies like Clear Channel ask fans of classic rock bands like Led Zeppelin what else they listen to, add songs to the playlist based off of that, and then cater to different geographic regions based on taste. For instance, in FiveThirtyEight’s data set, Bad Company and Heart songs are played more in San Antonio and Houston, respectively, than anywhere else in the country.

Mötley Crüe is also played 4.3 times as much in San Antonio compared to average.

Screenshot from FiveThirtyEight.
Screenshot from FiveThirtyEight.

Other areas in the South tend to listen to “harder” classic rock, like Metallica and KISS. This, Wellman told FiveThirtyEight, is because of immigration.

“The Hispanic influx across the southern United States vastly changes the rock landscape,” he told FiveThirtyEight. “The common conventional wisdom is that Hispanics who listen to English-language rock like a significantly harder brand of English-language rock. In markets where that is an influence, you’ll see that.”

More: See Axl Rose and AC/DC kick off “Rock or Bust” tour in 2016

As Gen Xers and Baby Boomers grow older and Millennials begin to take up more of the advertising market share, however, the classic rock genre might skew younger based on what younger listeners add. So, we’re probably going to start hearing a lot more Green Day, My Chemical Romance, blink-182, The Strokes and other 1990s-2000s rock bands hit their “classic” phase soon.

Check out the full article and all of its methodology here.

George Strait song one of the worst in Texas? Listmakers explain

Remember on Tuesday, when George Strait’s “All My Exes Live in Texas” landed at No. 4 on an online list of “worst songs in Texas history”?

George Strait presents an awards at the Americana Music Association Honors & Awards Show Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)
George Strait presents an awards at the Americana Music Association Honors & Awards Show Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)

Texans remembered. And they weren’t too happy about this treasonous act towards King George.

When Super Bash Houston released the list, the results of a random poll of 1,000 Texans, media outlets (including this one) jumped on the news with headlines like “Some folks are talking trash about George Strait in his home state,”  “George Strait lands on an online list of ‘worst Texas songs’” and “Survey: George Strait chart-topper about Texas a ‘musical misfire.'”

After all the fuss, Joe Paonessa, the co-founder of Houston Super Bash, felt he needed to speak out.

“We really love all types of music and wanted to include significant country songs on the list so that we represented the musical tastes of the entire Lone Star State,” Paonessa wrote in a news release Thursday. “George Strait was really chosen because he is so well known and the song is so strongly associated with Texas. We expected a very small percentage of the vote to go to him and Texans were invited to also select ‘other’ but only 1.3% did.

More: George Strait says country music is ‘trending towards traditional’

“The Houston Super Bash wants to extend George Strait a standing VIP invitation to the event and offer to play any song (other than ‘All My Ex’s Live in Texas’) and hope that he will accept.”

Paonessa also explained why “Achy Breaky Heart” was included in the survey: “It was not a Texas song or artist, but a Texan voted it on the survey.”

Here are the full rankings again, from “worst” to “not as worse,” just in case you missed them:

More: Super Bowl bites: Get a taste of New England and Georgia at Austin restaurants

George Strait lands on an online list of ‘worst Texas songs’

Sure, “All My Exes Live In Texas” is a novelty song, to be fair, but does it deserve to be included on an online list of “worst songs in Texas history” right next to “Ice Ice Baby”?

Apparently a survey of 1,000 Texans believe so, according to Super Bash Houston. The Super Bowl weekend festival group commissioned the survey and asked 1,000 random Texans to name their state’s worst song about Texas or performed by a Texan. The results were diverse.

George Strait poses for a portrait following his press conference at the MGM Grand Resort and Casino on Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015, in Las Vegas, Nev. Strait announced on Tuesday, Sept. 22, that he’s releasing a new album, “Cold Beer Conversation,” on Friday and that he’ll play a series of shows at the new Las Vegas Arena when it opens in 2016. (Photo by Al Powers/Powers Imagery/Invision/AP)
George Strait poses for a portrait following his press conference at the MGM Grand Resort and Casino on Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015, in Las Vegas, Nev. (Photo by Al Powers/Powers Imagery/Invision/AP)

While King George scored towards the more favorable end of the survey (thank God), with just 12 percent of those surveyed thinking that “All My Exes” is THE WORST, the artist responsible for the survey’s worst song was the Waco-born Ashlee Simpson. Her 2004 song “La La” led the pack with 25 percent of the vote.

More: George Strait says country music is ‘trending towards traditional’

Here are the full results, from “worst” to “not as worse”:

“Most festivals try to guess what your favorite songs are, we went the extra mile to find out what songs and artists you really hate and guarantee you won’t hear them at the Super Bash,” said Houston Super Bash co-founder Joe Paonessa in a news release.

More: Super Bowl bites: Get a taste of New England and Georgia at Austin restaurants

 

Yelp users rate two Austin-area restaurants among best in U.S.

Get your restaurant reviewing muscles ready. Yelp named two Austin-area restaurants to its 2017 “Top 100 Places to Eat” list. One restaurant, Boteco, is a Brazilian food truck located in downtown Austin between Sixth and Seventh streets. The other place, Back Draft Pizzeria, is located in Bee Cave at 3595 Ranch Road 620 S.

Boteco, a Brazilian street food truck at 1403 E. Seventh St. serves yuca fries, feijoada (black bean stew with pork) and coxinha (fried chicken balls similar to a croquette). Photo by Mike Galante/@mikegalante
Boteco, a Brazilian street food truck at 1403 E. Seventh St. serves yuca fries, feijoada (black bean stew with pork) and coxinha (fried chicken balls similar to a croquette). Photo by Mike Galante/@mikegalante

Here is what Yelp reviewers had to say about Boteco:

  • “This place is amazing – my girlfriend and I had the Coxinha, Piccanha, and Yucca Fries – each dish was absolutely fantastic.” – Daniel D.
  • “This in my opinion is the best food that has ever came off a food truck.  Words cannot explain how delicious the food is here.  If you stop by I promise you it will be the best Brazilian food on planet earth.  Staff is friendly and courteous, they are second to none in my opinion.” – John R.
  • “Hands down best food truck in Austin. The food is incredible and the guys working the truck are some of the nicest we’ve met. They also gave me free snacks while we waited, which is the way to a pregnant women’s heart.” – Lauren A.

RELATED: Looking to eat out? Check Austin360Eats first

And here is what some Yelpers had to say about Back Draft Pizzeria:

  • “You know how you nurse and savor your last beer?  You will find yourself doing this with your last slice of this pizza. Just do it in private otherwise the rest of your family will scarf it down.  It is really that good.” – Steve S.
  • “The whole menu is awesome and the service is above an beyond what I would expect from a pizza food truck (better than a brick and mortar pizza place!” – Victoria W.

  • “Still my favorite pizza in Austin! When my husband goes out of town I get the twisted rita and on numerous occasions ate the whole damn pie. I can’t even feel guilty about it, everything, I mean EVERYTHING, is made fresh! Everything is also consistent, from the food to the amazing service. Scarlett and her husband Izak are always making an effort to ensure you feel taken care of. If you haven’t tried this place yet, you are missing out!” – Jenna M.

You’re probably going to need to eat at more than two restaurants in 2017, however. We’ve got a whole dining guide to make the decisions a little easier.