New San Antonio H-E-B adding a drive-thru barbecue restaurant

 

It’s no secret Texans love their barbecue. It’s also a verifiable truth that H-E-B is one of the mot beloved grocery stores in the state, and maybe even America. Put the two together, and you’ve got a winning formula.

RICARDO B. BRAZZIELL/AMERICAN-STATESMAN

That’s right, Texas. H-E-B is about to introduce drive-thru barbecue stands to certain stores starting in August, the San Antonio Express-News reports.  Customers will be able to enjoy meals from True Texas BBQ, the grocery chain’s barbecue brand. The restaurant will also serve breakfast tacos, because of course it will.

More: Torchy’s Tacos lands on ‘11 absolute best taco shops’ online list

“Even if families don’t need to necessarily do a full shop, the True Texas BBQ will be a spot where families can go and dine together and enjoy what is arguably some of the best barbecue in Texas,” H-E-B spokesperson Dya Campos told the Express-News Wednesday.

Sadly for Austinites, it looks like we’re still stuck waiting in line at Franklin. So far, the only store to feature the True Texas BBQ restaurant will be in San Antonio, as part of a new 118,000-square-foot H-E-B in the southwest corner of Loop 1604 and Bulverde Road.

This in’t the first time H-E-B has partnered with restaurants to enhance the grocery shopping experience. Hutto recently opened a 24-hour Whataburger drive-thru at one of its new H-E-B locations. And let’s not forget you can also get that fancy Whataburger ketchup and Taco Cabana sauce at H-E-B.

Related: Texas teen brags about stealing doughnuts from H-E-B

Willie Nelson and Morgan Freeman hanging out on a bus is friendship goals

Getting a phone call to come hang out with Willie Nelson sounds like the dream, but can you imagine getting to chat with a Hollywood star too?

Country radio legend Bill Mack recently shared on Facebook that his pal called him to hang out on his bus in North Texas. And of all the people in the world, Morgan Freeman happened to be aboard too.

Mack asked the Oscar winner all about the movie biz. Freeman’s favorite roles include “Shawshank Redemption,” “Driving Miss Daisy,” “Glory,” and “Unforgiven.” And Freeman, who turns 80 this year, shared some of his favorite movies, which all happened to be released before 1960.

As for what brought Freeman and Nelson together, it turns out the megawatt actor doesn’t live in Hollywood. Like Mack, Nelson called up his famous friend, who lives in Clarksdale, Mississippi to hang and Freeman happily obliged.

Read the full post below:

Bet you can guess Texas’ most embarrassing online search habit

 

Last week, Republicans in Congress passed the repeal of an Internet privacy rule implemented by the FCC last year. The rule would have prohibited Internet service providers from selling the browsing history of their customers.

FILE — Computers at the 53rd Street branch of the New York Public Library system, in New York, June 14, 2016. The House voted on Tuesday March 28, 2017, largely along party lines, to dismantle rules created by the FCC requiring broadband providers get permission before collecting data on a user?s online activity. (Santiago Mejia/The New York Times)

The repeal doesn’t necessarily mean your browsing history is for sale, but if it is, and you’re a Texan, you’re in trouble. Or rather, you might be in trouble if you’re embarrassed about searching for pornography.

More: Almost every U.S. representative from Central Texas voted for repeal of Internet privacy rule

The folks over at High Speed Internet have compiled a list of each state’s “online guilty pleasure,” and Texas residents apparently like searching for “XXX Content,” as the list calls it. Texans aren’t alone; porn was also the top guilty pleasure for Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana and New Mexico.

Other big “guilty pleasures”: Alaska really loves Googling celebrity news, Florida is big into “sugar daddy” sites, Utah can’t get enough fitness models, Colorado likes “fail videos,” and Mississippi residents love themselves some “Watch Me (Whip/Nae Nae).”

View the full map here.

Related:

Guess what word Texans can’t spell

Texas’ favorite reality show isn’t surprising

Texans’ Google searches since the election heavy on secession and SCOTUS

 

Why you can’t find a bottle of glue around Austin this weekend

If you’re hoping to make slime — the “it” craft project of the moment — you might have to get creative about where you get your glue.

Glitter slime is one of the many different kinds of slime for which you can find tutorials online. It’s become a phenomenon among kids and teens right now.

Slime is the latest craft project to go viral, thanks in no small part to YouTube and Instagram, where DIY lovers flock to share their latest and greatest creations.

My kids and I first made galaxy slime last fall, and the recipe for mixing glue and Borax to make a stretchy, mesmerizing goo has grown so much in popularity that we’ve had a hard time finding glue at local stores.

This was the scene yesterday at Walmart:

I posted about it online, and lots of parents responded with slime stories of their own, including tips about where you can still find glue (Michael’s and Five Below) and reports of having to throw out large quantities from a classroom.

“It’s the new bottle flip trend,” one teacher said.

Although I have been known to ban bottle flipping in certain situations, I like the slime project.

We’ve had fun making it, giving it as gifts and turning it into a lesson about Non-Neutonian fluids, but not everyone loves it. Slime is starting to get banned at schools (and households) for possible burns, stains and plain ol’ parent/teacher annoyance. I also heard on Facebook about some students turning their hobby into a business by selling slime in school.

Have you made slime with your kids? Have you heard about edible slime? Any slime disaster stories to share? We’d love to hear about it in the comments.

‘Veronica Mars’ started as a YA novel set at Austin-area Westlake High School

 

A long time ago, “Veronica Mars” used to be set in Austin. But we haven’t thought about that lately at all. Until now.

Kristen Bell plays the title character in “Veronica Mars.” The film version of the ’90s television series opened in March, 2014. CREDIT: ROBERT VOETS

Fans of the the CW’s criminally short-lived teen detective series “Veronica Mars” are well aware that the show took place in the radically divided Neptune, Calif., a town where all that separated the elite socialites from the seedy criminals was a murky gray line of questionable morality.

But, as Entertainment Weekly has revealed, the show wasn’t always set in California. In fact, “Veronica Mars” wasn’t even originally imagined as a TV show. At first, it was going to be a Young Adult novel set right here in Austin at Westlake High School, and the titular character later became Veronica’s dad, Keith.

First things first: If you haven’t already seen “Veronica Mars,” you’re missing out. The plot centered around Veronica Mars (Kristen Bell), a high school student who moonlighted as a private eye for her father Keith. Keith was a former sheriff who opened up his own detective agency when he failed to get re-elected after he accused a Neptune socialite of murdering his own daughter (and Veronica’s best friend).

Related: This year’s ATX Television Festival is scheduled for June. Here’s what’s scheduled so far.

“Veronica Mars” was full of noir, camp, crime, quippy teens and lots of high school mysteries to solve. It also went to some pretty dark places in its examinations of class, race, wealth, sex and morality. The show was cancelled after three seasons, but a crowd-funded film was released in 2014 after a fourth season pilot was ordered by a network but never aired. Since the film’s release, series creator Rob Thomas has partnered with Austin author Jennifer Graham to write two books continuing the story of the plucky sleuth.

Rob Thomas on the red carpet for the movie Veronica Mars in Austin, Texas on March 7, 2014. (Thao Nguyen/FOR AMERICAN-STATESMAN)

Anyway, Thomas originally intended for the story to be told as a young adult novel. He started a draft, “Untitled Teen Detective,” in 1996. That draft was shared with Entertainment Weekly this week for its “Hollywood’s Greatest Untold Stories” issue.

From the archives: Fresh from filming ‘Veronica Mars,’ Rob Thomas returns triumphant

Thomas set “Untitled Teen Detective” in Austin. His story revolved around Keith Mars, teenage detective. Keith became a detective after his father quit a promising career with the Austin Police Department to open up a private investigation agency. Like in the TV show, there is no mother figure in the picture. Also like in the show, the titular young detective starts out by catching the parents of his wealthy Westlake High School classmates in after-hours trysts at seedy motels.

via GIPHY

Another Texas twist: Keith pines for a popular girl who’s said to be dating a University of Texas football player.

But perhaps the biggest Austin element to the “Veronica Mars”-that-almost-was is a still-unsolved mystery that’s only hinted at. In the original draft, Keith discovers that the reason his dad left the police force is because he knowingly sent the wrong men to Death Row for involvement in Austin’s “Chocolate Shop Murders case,” a name which bears a striking resemblance to the real-life, still-unsolved Austin yogurt shop murders from 1991.

Years later, when Thomas took ideas from the draft into a spec script he sold to UPN (now The CW), Keith Mars became the disgraced law enforcement father figure, the main character became Veronica, and the main plot centered on a different kid of murder.

All of the Texas setting came natural to Thomas. He grew up in Texas, graduating from San Marcos High school in 1983. His father was a vice-principal at Westlake until the early 1990s, and Thomas attended Texas Christian University on a football scholarship before transferring to UT and graduating in 1987. Thomas was working as a high school teacher at John H. Reagan High School in Austin when he wrote the first draft of “Untitled Teen Detective,” and many characters in “Veronica Mars” were named for Austinites he met or musicians he played with. The music of several Austin bands also played in the show.

From the archives: ‘Veronica Mars’ film has many Austin music moments

Alas, the Texas version of “Veronica Mars” is not the version that made it to the small screen. Maybe someday, if Netflix reboots the series (one can only hope) a mystery might take Veronica all the way to Austin.

What people are saying about the Austin cop caught speeding on MoPac

 

An assistant Austin police chief was recently caught on a dashboard camera video in February after he got pulled over for driving 92 mph on MoPac Boulevard (Loop 1) and drove off with a warning.

Assistant Chief Chris McIlvain was in an unmarked patrol car on his way to Waco to see a Baylor basketball game when he got pulled over for speeding.

More: Clocked at 92 mph on MoPac, Austin assistant police chief gets warning

After a short discussion about his speeding, McIlvain apologized for his speed, and the officer who pulled him over said “Take care, buddy.”

When news broke of the traffic stop, Austin interim police chief Brian Manley called a press conference to say that he ordered McIlvain be issued a $195 ticket.

“I expect officers of this department to comply with the law, whether it be criminal or traffic laws, just like we expect the citizens to,” Manley said Tuesday.

Readers, however, were quick to sound off on the video on social media.

Some admired that anyone could get up to 92 mph on MoPac, regardless of who it was…

While many people were angry at a perceived level of favoritism within the police department…

While some people weren’t that shocked by the incident…

While @EvilMoPacATX just tweeted what we were all thinking.

https://twitter.com/EvilMopacATX/status/846846043455209472

What about you? What do you think? Let us know in the comments.

Ruth Negga of ‘Loving’ shows you how to make a proper Irish coffee

 

If you saw last year’s “Loving,” Austin director Jeff Nichols’ film about the landmark 1967 Loving v. Virginia Supreme Court case that decriminalized interracial marriage in America, you know Ruth Negga can act.

031416 SXSW film

But despite her great accent and acting performance in that film, Negga isn’t American; she’s Ethiopian and Irish. And today, in honor of St. Patrick’s Day, she’s teaching everyone how to make a proper Irish coffee.

Read our review: In ‘Loving,’ love wins

In a video for Vanity Fair, a pink-dress-clad Negga demonstrates the proper technique for creating the cocktail.

“I have never done this before, and never in a pink dress, so we’ll see how this goes,” Negga says as she starts to pour some coffee.

More: Where to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in Austin

Negga’s recipe involves about a third glass of coffee, half a glass of whiskey (“the most important ingredient”), a heaping of sugar and a little bit of cream.

Watch the full video below.

 

Austin’s White Denim partners with Spotify to create song that only plays when it’s raining

 

Spotify announced a new feature Monday that’s sure to excite that niche group of people who love rainy weather and geotargeting.

The rain did not keep people away from S. Congress Avenue on Saturday, January 31st, 2015. People wait in line underneath umbrellas for food at a local restaurant. Photo by Laura Skelding

The streaming giant has partnered with The North Face and Austin band White Denim to create a song that you can only hear when it’s raining outside, Pitchfork reports.

The gist is Spotify will use the location services on your phone to push the song into areas and markets where there’s discernible rainfall at any given time. (But only in the U.S.)

Review: White Denim taping of ‘Austin City Limits’

A snippet of the song, called “No Nee Ta Slode Aln,” can be heard in a commercial for The North Face Apex Flex GTX Jacket.

Guess you’re out of luck if you’re a White Denim fan who lives in Arizona or the California desert. But the rest of us can sit back, relax, and know that Spotify is bringing us one step closer to Skynet.

If you like the song and want to hear more from White Denim, they’re playing at South By Southwest on Thursday and Friday. 

[H/T Pitchfork]

SXSW-goers find Austin’s lack of Uber, Lyft disturbing

 

South By Southwest is in full swing, which means crowds. Crowds everywhere, full of people with panels and parties to attend.

Many of those people forgot (or didn’t know) that Uber and Lyft no longer operate within the Austin city limits. And when it rains all weekend, as it did last weekend, people got upset at the gouged prices and long wait times for Austin alternatives Fasten and RideAustin.

Fasten is the latest mobile ride-hailing app to jump into the Austin market. Credit: Fasten

More: What we learned about Austin’s ride-hailing options by testing six of Austin’s ride-hailing apps

Making matters worse, both Fasten and RideAustin went down on Saturday night’s rainstorms, creating issues for people who needed rides, and needed them ASAP.

Local ride-hailing service RideAustin posted on Facebook early Sunday morning that its database locked up throughout most of the evening Saturday, and Kirill Evdakov, CEO of Fasten, confirmed that service also had problems, beginning a little after 8 p.m. Saturday. He called SXSW, rainy weather, and glitches with other services simultaneously “a perfect storm” that led to Fasten receiving about 12 times as many ride requests as normal.

More: Two Austin ride-hailing services report problems in first days of SXSW

During the outage, many people complained on Twitter about the resulting price surges…

https://twitter.com/HeyHeyESJ/status/840948977986093056

While some people who just got into town were aghast that Austin does not have Uber or Lyft anymore…

https://twitter.com/Jason/status/841031230997032961

https://twitter.com/tjparker/status/840551537235644417

One person was angry at Uber and Lyft for leaving Austin after the May election that included Proposition 1…

While another was worried about how RideAustin’s app could legally exist because it looks so close to Uber’s…

While many people thought the whole idea of complaining about transportation during a huge conference event was preposterous…

https://twitter.com/sssssparkers/status/841083082170068994

https://twitter.com/samfbiddle/status/841047517567569920

And others simply found (gasp!) other means of transportation for the weekend.

 

Anyhow, the whole event got its own Twitter moment Sunday night:

However, many people who arrived in town Thursday night for SXSW Interactive were well aware of the ridesharing situation in Austin. The following is from breaking news reporter Katie Hall, who went out to Austin-Bergstrom International Airport Thursday night to interview conference-goers.

Britt Deyan, of San Francisco, landed in Austin on Thursday night for SXSW Interactive. Deyan said that SXSW had been good about sharing the fact that Uber and Lyft no longer gave rides in Austin.

“Every communication I was sent about SXSW told me Uber wasn’t here,” Deyan said as she climbed into a taxi.

Alisa Hetrick and Sami Huerta, both of Minneapolis, also grabbed a taxi after landing at the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport. Hetrick and Huerta said they had been told by friends in Austin, who invited them to SXSW, that Uber and Lyft didn’t operate in Austin.

A group of six Mashable employees huddled together outside the airport after landing in Austin, discussing the ride-hailing app RideAustin. Their company had called a car ahead of time to pick them up, they said. A few of the people in the group said they were well aware of the fact that Uber and Lyft left Austin because their website had written about it. One of them, however, was not.

“I didn’t know until just now,” she said, after asking the reporter for ride-hailing app suggestions. “After the tragedy that happened a couple years ago at SXSW, I think they’re asking for another tragedy.” She declined to give her name.

What about you? Have you been having a tough time getting around at SXSW? Let us know in the comments.

Statesman reporters Katie Hall and Elizabeth Findell contributed to this report.

‘Get Out’ fans are re-creating one of the film’s weirdest scenes with the #GetOutChallenge

 

“Get Out” has proven to be a massive success at the box office since its release two weeks ago, thanks in no small part to its smart blend of genuinely horrifying scares, laugh-out-loud humor and prescient racial commentary.

Daniel Kaluuya stars as Chris in “Get Out.” (Justin Lubin, Universal Pictures)

But now fans of the Jordan Peele-helmed film are re-enacting one of its more disorienting scenes, and some of them are hurting themselves in the process.

The #GetOutChallenge involves a cameraperson in the know filming a friend running full-speed directly at the camera, only to quickly turn away at the last second. The challenge is a riff on the spooky scene where the film’s protagonist Chris goes out for a smoke at night, and Walter the groundskeeper charges at him full-steam ahead. (Why he’s running is an even crazier twist that’s best kept secret if you haven’t seen the film).

The meme has become quite popular on Twitter and Snapchat.

There are plenty of good examples:

Steph Curry even posted his own version on Instagram.

View this post on Instagram

Trying to escape the sunken place #getout

A post shared by Wardell Curry (@stephencurry30) on

Some people got hurt, though.

https://twitter.com/joyyymiller/status/839294890034896897?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

https://twitter.com/CHRISMULLY05/status/839307278289362944?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

As of this writing, there’s even five whole Twitter accounts devoted to the best videos of the challenge.