She used to wash dishes at an Austin Chipotle. Now she’s a fashion week model.

On Aug. 10, 19-year-old Remington Williams was washing dishes during her shift at a North Austin Chipotle when a modeling agency spotted her.

It’s a Cinderella story for the ages.

On Aug. 10, 19-year-old Remington Williams was washing dishes during her shift at a North Austin Chipotle when a modeling agency spotted her.

Tanni Foreman of Foreman Management took this photo of Remington Williams on Aug. 10, the day she discovered Williams during her shift at an Austin Chipotle. credit: Tanni Foreman/Foreman Management

When they asked if she’d be interested in becoming a model, Williams, an ACC student studying graphic design who has no prior modeling experience, was shocked. And intrigued.

Now, barely a month later, she’s walked runways for the likes of Calvin Klein and Marc Jacobs at New York Fashion Week, London Fashion Week, Milan Fashion Week and, currently, Paris Fashion Week.

Tanni Foreman, who owns model scouting and placement agency Foreman Management, was out to dinner with her husband and daughter at the Chipotle at 1700 W. Parmer Lane on Aug. 10 when she saw Williams in the back of the restaurant, “lugging around huge trays and washing dishes.”

Calvin Klein Collection - Runway - September 2017 - New York Fashion Week
Remington Williams walks as part of the Calvin Klein show during New York Fashion Week on Sept. 7. It was her first fashion show. credit: Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images

“She’s wearing this Chipotle uniform — T-shirt, hat, pants,” Foreman said. “With me, when I see a potential model, I can tell really quickly, I can see in their face if they’ve got what it takes.”

After a quick chat during Williams’ lunch break, they arranged to meet the next day at Foreman’s company, Foreman Management, a “mother agency” that scouts talent and helps place models all over the world. For the next few days, Foreman said she walked Williams through the ins and outs of modeling and sent her photos to a high-profile agency called DNA Models, which replied that they wanted Williams to walk in New York Fashion Week.

Soon, Williams, who could not be reached for comment due to her busy travel schedule, was on a plane to the Big Apple. She walked her first runway as part of Calvin Klein’s show on Sept. 7. She walked for Marc Jacobs on Sept. 13.

Marc Jacobs SS18 Collection - Runway
Remington Williams walks the runway for Marc Jacobs SS18 fashion show during New York Fashion Week at Park Avenue Armory on Sept. 13 in New York City. credit: Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for Marc Jacobs

“Normally the agencies have more time to develop the girls before Fashion Week and be gently introduced to the industry,” said Foreman, who spent time with Williams in both New York and London showing her the ropes. “She was kind of thrown into the madness of it.”

For now, Williams, who was dubbed by Vogue as “Fashion Week’s buzziest model,” seems to be embracing the madness. She posted a photo of herself on Instagram earlier this week with the Eiffel Tower in the background and the caption “Paris is the most magical place I’ve ever seen. I never want to leave!”

“She went from scrubbing pots at Chipotle to meeting designers at Fashion Week. Her work ethic is so strong, she’s grateful for everything,” Foreman said. “That’s my favorite part of this business. I love finding somebody and changing their life.”

Don’t open your eyes underwater at Barton Springs? Here’s what it looks like

Unless you snorkel or open your eyes underwater, you might not have seen what it looks like underwater at Barton Springs, where the water is a cool 70 to 74 degrees.

This is the color of Barton Springs in the middle of July. Addie Broyles / American-Statesman

WATCH: Barton Springs isn’t really 68 degrees. How warm is it?

Well, have a look.

I took this video earlier today with my iPhone in an underwater case that was the best impulse buy of last summer.

RELATED: Former Barton Springs lifeguards recall life on the stand

PHOTOS: Barton Springs Pool way, way back when

As temperatures continues to rise, Barton Springs will fill up earlier each day.

Here are a few tips so you can enjoy your own visit:

  • Parking is already someone chaotic already, so be prepared to walk from one of the upper parking lots in Zilker Park.
  • Entry fee is $3 if you’re a resident of Austin, $8 if you’re not. Kids are $1 or $2, depending on their age.
  • You can pay with a card at one of the meters outside both the north and south entrances.
  • Bring a floatie, but leave the food and drinks behind. You can’t bring anything to eat or drink besides water into Barton Springs.
  • Entrance to the pool is free before 8 a.m. and after 9 p.m. The pool opens at 5 a.m. and closes at 10 p.m.
  • On full moon nights, where people flock to the pool to howl at the moon, the park can fill to capacity, so don’t wait until 9 p.m. if you really want to get in.

RELATED:
At Barton Springs, lifeguard job takes on sunscreen-slathered mystique
Need adventure? Swim naked at Barton Springs
Austin360 Summer Fun Guide

 

If Ronco is part of Austin now, then these funky TV ads are Austin history

This image from a television commercial shows Ron Popeil, founder of Ronco, selling some of the company’s products. Ronco — known for such gadgets as the Veg-O-Matic and the Pocket Fisherman — is now headquartered in Austin.

You might know Ronco Brands, a new Austin-based holding company, has filed to raise $30 million in an initial public offering.

Founded by inventor and entrepreneur Ron Popeil in 1964, Ronco is famous for gadgets sold on late-night infomercials. Though it has struggled financially in recent years, Ronco maintains that it has sold over $2 billion in Ronco-branded products in the U.S. since its inception.

 

Let’s look back at a few classics from decades ago:

 

Take that, BeDazzler!

 

Awww, yiss. The original gangster.

 

Perpetuating stereotypes and enabling creeps in cars since 1978!

 

Hear that? That’s the sound of every hipster in town flocking to eBay …

 

Nothing says sex appeal like “rich foamy dust.”

 

“Want to come over? I got ‘Boogie Nights.'” “On DVD?” “Nah, baby. On 8-track!”

Austin drag queen returns for another lap on ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race’

Sashaying away early from “RuPaul’s Drag Race” couldn’t stop one Austin drag queen’s rising star. Cynthia Lee Fontaine is back in the competition for season 9.

RuPaul’s Drag Race season 8 premiere featuring Austin’s own Cynthia Lee Fontaine, at Ironwood Hall on Friday, Feb. 26, 2016 in Austin, Texas. (Erika Rich for American-Statesman)

The zany performer, who was eliminated in the third episode of the show’s eighth season last year, was revealed Friday as the ninth and current season’s secret 14th contestant. Fontaine also announced the news on her Instagram.

The flamboyant comedy performer, a fixture at Oilcan Harry’s in downtown Austin, was diagnosed with stage 1 liver cancer shortly after returning to town from filming season eight. Fontaine (aka Carlos Hernandez) has since gone into remission, and the storyline featured prominently in her return to the show.

View this post on Instagram

Good afternoon miss amores: Today marks one year I received my first Chemo treatment for my live cancer stage 1. Today I can say I'm blessed because I'm on remission for almost 7 months! Thanks to my parents for been my guardians and angel true all this journey (maria and Rene on the pic) thanks to my sister @acidbetty for taking care of me and her friendship!!!! @misslailamcqueen you were an angel and friend support me in this experience te amo !!! To my best friends Miguel, Jeremy , Gloria , Javier and Chris love you guys !!!! To my family , and drag family thank you !!! To world of wonder and logo tv thank you for everything!!!!!!To all miss amores cucu fans you are amazing!!! Do not forget to help, support this cause and spread love !!! Blessings and Celebrate life !! #misscongeniality #happycucu #letskickcancerinthecucu #rpdr 🎗🎗🎗

A post shared by Cynthia Lee Fontaine (@cynthialeefontaine) on

“It’s a wonderful experience to represent Austin, Texas, my Hispanic community, and my community here in Austin,” Fontaine told Austin360 before the debut of “Drag Race” season 8. “We are equipped with great performers — female, male, androgynous, campy, trashy, whatever — and this city provides everything in between. So I’m just proud that I can represent a little piece of that and share it with the entire world.”

Oilcan Harry’s will host “Drag Race” viewing parties all season on Friday nights, so you can root for Fontaine on her home turf. Watch Fontaine’s “Meet the Queens” interview for season 9 below.

‘Veronica Mars’ started as a YA novel set at Austin-area Westlake High School

 

A long time ago, “Veronica Mars” used to be set in Austin. But we haven’t thought about that lately at all. Until now.

Kristen Bell plays the title character in “Veronica Mars.” The film version of the ’90s television series opened in March, 2014. CREDIT: ROBERT VOETS

Fans of the the CW’s criminally short-lived teen detective series “Veronica Mars” are well aware that the show took place in the radically divided Neptune, Calif., a town where all that separated the elite socialites from the seedy criminals was a murky gray line of questionable morality.

But, as Entertainment Weekly has revealed, the show wasn’t always set in California. In fact, “Veronica Mars” wasn’t even originally imagined as a TV show. At first, it was going to be a Young Adult novel set right here in Austin at Westlake High School, and the titular character later became Veronica’s dad, Keith.

First things first: If you haven’t already seen “Veronica Mars,” you’re missing out. The plot centered around Veronica Mars (Kristen Bell), a high school student who moonlighted as a private eye for her father Keith. Keith was a former sheriff who opened up his own detective agency when he failed to get re-elected after he accused a Neptune socialite of murdering his own daughter (and Veronica’s best friend).

Related: This year’s ATX Television Festival is scheduled for June. Here’s what’s scheduled so far.

“Veronica Mars” was full of noir, camp, crime, quippy teens and lots of high school mysteries to solve. It also went to some pretty dark places in its examinations of class, race, wealth, sex and morality. The show was cancelled after three seasons, but a crowd-funded film was released in 2014 after a fourth season pilot was ordered by a network but never aired. Since the film’s release, series creator Rob Thomas has partnered with Austin author Jennifer Graham to write two books continuing the story of the plucky sleuth.

Rob Thomas on the red carpet for the movie Veronica Mars in Austin, Texas on March 7, 2014. (Thao Nguyen/FOR AMERICAN-STATESMAN)

Anyway, Thomas originally intended for the story to be told as a young adult novel. He started a draft, “Untitled Teen Detective,” in 1996. That draft was shared with Entertainment Weekly this week for its “Hollywood’s Greatest Untold Stories” issue.

From the archives: Fresh from filming ‘Veronica Mars,’ Rob Thomas returns triumphant

Thomas set “Untitled Teen Detective” in Austin. His story revolved around Keith Mars, teenage detective. Keith became a detective after his father quit a promising career with the Austin Police Department to open up a private investigation agency. Like in the TV show, there is no mother figure in the picture. Also like in the show, the titular young detective starts out by catching the parents of his wealthy Westlake High School classmates in after-hours trysts at seedy motels.

via GIPHY

Another Texas twist: Keith pines for a popular girl who’s said to be dating a University of Texas football player.

But perhaps the biggest Austin element to the “Veronica Mars”-that-almost-was is a still-unsolved mystery that’s only hinted at. In the original draft, Keith discovers that the reason his dad left the police force is because he knowingly sent the wrong men to Death Row for involvement in Austin’s “Chocolate Shop Murders case,” a name which bears a striking resemblance to the real-life, still-unsolved Austin yogurt shop murders from 1991.

Years later, when Thomas took ideas from the draft into a spec script he sold to UPN (now The CW), Keith Mars became the disgraced law enforcement father figure, the main character became Veronica, and the main plot centered on a different kid of murder.

All of the Texas setting came natural to Thomas. He grew up in Texas, graduating from San Marcos High school in 1983. His father was a vice-principal at Westlake until the early 1990s, and Thomas attended Texas Christian University on a football scholarship before transferring to UT and graduating in 1987. Thomas was working as a high school teacher at John H. Reagan High School in Austin when he wrote the first draft of “Untitled Teen Detective,” and many characters in “Veronica Mars” were named for Austinites he met or musicians he played with. The music of several Austin bands also played in the show.

From the archives: ‘Veronica Mars’ film has many Austin music moments

Alas, the Texas version of “Veronica Mars” is not the version that made it to the small screen. Maybe someday, if Netflix reboots the series (one can only hope) a mystery might take Veronica all the way to Austin.

These famous Austin fries were named some of the best in U.S.

You know what fries go well with? Burgers. You know what else they go well with? The endorphin-rushing satisfaction of national culinary praise.

(Photo by Dale Rice/AMERICAN-STATESMAN file)

The locally beloved French fries served at Hyde Park Bar & Grill have been named among the 20 best in the country by Food & Wine magazine. From the magazine’s accolade:

“Hyde Park treats its fries like many people treat fried chicken: by soaking cut potatoes in buttermilk, battering them, and then frying them. They’re served with a side of mayo that’s kicked up with jalapeños and dill. Possibly the most famous fries in Austin, and deservedly so.”

As a news release from the restaurant points out, this is not the first honor bestowed upon the fried tubers. Last year, the dish also made Food Network Magazine’s list of “10 Best French Fries in the US” list and People’s “15 Best French Fries in the US” list. The fries have been on the Hyde Park Bar & Grill menu since the restaurant opened in 1982.

MORE: Here’s where to celebrate National French Fry Day in Austin

We should also mention that Austin360 restaurant critic Matthew Odam calls the Hyde Park fries some of the most “overrated” in Austin.

READ: Whataburger puts French fry pedicabs in Austin for SXSW

Also on the list with an Austin connection: the duck fat fries at Salty Sow. Food & Wine spotlights the egg-and-béarnaise-topped dish at the gastropub’s Arizona location, though you can get the same fries at the Austin location on Manor Road.

Soon you’ll be able to get a tattoo and a haircut in the same place, because Austin

If you’ve ever gotten a haircut and left the salon wishing you had made a more permanent change than trimmed sideburns, we have good news. A combination barbershop and tattoo parlor is opening in Austin next month.

(Photo by Brian Nixon)

Tried & True Barber & Tattoo is set to open April 10 at 6501 South Congress Ave., according to CultureMap Austin.

MORE: Ingrid Michaelson got a tattoo before her show in Austin

From CultureMap:

“In the early 20th century, it was common for a tattoo artist to rent space in the back of a barbershop. Plus, with both professions being so similar in nature, it’s too cool of an idea not to continue the tradition,” say the owners in a joint statement.

On its Facebook page, Tried & True writes that it “is a full service barber shop and tattoo studio offering clipper & scissor cuts, straight razor shaves, and beard trimming and custom tattoo design.” Walk-ins will be accepted, as well as appointments.

PHOTOS: Star of Texas Tattoo Art Revival in January

CultureMap quotes the owners as saying that South Austin is a “hidden gem” not yet overrun with chain stores, which makes it the right spot for their buzz-and-ink boutique. However, it seems like such a one-stop-shop personal style headquarters would be welcomed just about anywhere in city limits, because we do love our tattoos.

RELATED READ: Austin man gets tattoo of viral blue and black dress

Dreams of living in Camelot? Check out this $2.3 million medieval home in South Austin

http://players.brightcove.net/1418563061/default_default/index.html?videoId=5378039487001

Want a home fit for a king (or queen)?

It looks unassuming from the outside, but this five-bedroom, four-bathroom home in Shady Hollow Estates has a custom stained glass and a “knight’s retreat” complete with ceiling paintings telling the knight’s story.

Credit: Travis Baker/Twist Tours

If you’ve ever wished you could live in a Renaissance fair year-round and you have a spare $2,285,000, then pull out your checkbook so you can meander through beautiful secret gardens filled with stone paths, rock walls and lush greenery.

GALLERY: See more photos from this house fit for Camelot royalty in South Austin

Credit: Travis Baker/Twist Tours

You can also take a swim in the “Neoclassical-inspired” pool fit for a Greek god …

Credit: Travis Baker/Twist Tours

… or feast like royalty in the purple dining room.

Credit: Travis Baker/Twist Tours

You know that one friend who always throws the best “Game of Thrones” watch parties, complete with themed food and costumes? Now you can one-up that guy.

If you’re interested in buying this fairytale castle to live out your King Arthur dream, you can find more details and realtor contact information here.

What people are saying about the Austin cop caught speeding on MoPac

 

An assistant Austin police chief was recently caught on a dashboard camera video in February after he got pulled over for driving 92 mph on MoPac Boulevard (Loop 1) and drove off with a warning.

Assistant Chief Chris McIlvain was in an unmarked patrol car on his way to Waco to see a Baylor basketball game when he got pulled over for speeding.

More: Clocked at 92 mph on MoPac, Austin assistant police chief gets warning

After a short discussion about his speeding, McIlvain apologized for his speed, and the officer who pulled him over said “Take care, buddy.”

When news broke of the traffic stop, Austin interim police chief Brian Manley called a press conference to say that he ordered McIlvain be issued a $195 ticket.

“I expect officers of this department to comply with the law, whether it be criminal or traffic laws, just like we expect the citizens to,” Manley said Tuesday.

Readers, however, were quick to sound off on the video on social media.

Some admired that anyone could get up to 92 mph on MoPac, regardless of who it was…

While many people were angry at a perceived level of favoritism within the police department…

While some people weren’t that shocked by the incident…

While @EvilMoPacATX just tweeted what we were all thinking.

https://twitter.com/EvilMopacATX/status/846846043455209472

What about you? What do you think? Let us know in the comments.

Richard Linklater on that time he got fired from an Austin hotel, and other words of wisdom about money

 

“Every single commodity you produce is a piece of your own death!” — Hitchhiker, “Slacker”

“Didja ever look at a dollar bill, man? There’s some spooky s*** goin’ on there.” — Slater, “Dazed and Confused”

The films of acclaimed director and Austin resident Richard Linklater don’t explicitly deal with money, but the characters in Linklater’s films often ruminate on philosophic ideas about money, capitalism, life, love, time and everything in between.

Austin Film Society Founder and Artistic Director Richard Linklater poses on the red carpet for the Texas Film Awards at Austin Studios where he later presented Shirley MacLaine with the lifetime achievement award. (Suzanne Cordeiro/American-Statesman)

Those philosophic ideas about money (such as the quotes above) stem from Linklater’sown experiences. Linklater shared those experiences in a 2016 guest blog post for WealthSimple, an investment website. In the year-old essay, Linklater writes about his relationship with money, and why he was glad he got fired from a job at La Mansion in Austin (now the Doubletree Hotel off I-35 North).

More: Richard Linklater adaptation of ‘Where’d You Go, Bernadette’ starring Cate Blanchett to start filming July 2017

The story goes like this:

When he was 27 years old, Linklater was working as a night bellhop at La Mansion. One night, he went to go pick up a customer at the airport and bragged about how his hotel job basically allowed him to read and write and he guessed that during a regular 8-hour shift, he only did about an hour to 90 minutes of actual work.

via GIPHY

Turns out, the guest Linklater picked up was the assistant regional manager for the hotel chain, and Linklater found a pink slip at the desk when he showed up to work 10 days later.

Related: Shirley MacLaine walks the Texas Film Awards red carpet with Richard Linklater

But, he said that experience allowed him to travel to New York and hone his screenwriting skills for a summer. Then, his filmmaking career started to take off.

“That Doubletree Hotel isn’t far from my daughter’s school, and we drive past it all the time. I’ve pointed it out to her: ‘See that place? That’s the last real job your dad ever had, the last honest buck I ever made!'” Linklater wrote in the blog post.

Linklater also dropped some pearls of wisdom about money, including these quotes that wouldn’t sound out of place in one of his films:

  • “The best advice I ever got about money was from a doctor I met a long time ago. He had plenty of money, and he told me, ‘Invest in yourself.'”
  • “Ultimately, for me, money is a bad motivator. I’m so blessed because I’ve never really done stuff for money. I just try to make the films I want to make and tell the stories I care most about. Once you really don’t give a f*** about money, it comes scratching at your door.”
  • “When you grow up pretty poor, you see money as the thing that will solve all of your problems.”
  • “Once you have a reasonable level of comfort—you’ve got a roof over your head, you can pay your bills, your utilities aren’t being shut off, you can fix your car—having more money doesn’t really increase your happiness.”

Read Linklater’s full blog post here.